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Friday, 17 January 2014 11:07

Amsterdam Winners 2013

Written by

The 124th Amsterdam All Winners dog show was itself a winner in deepest December at the Rai Centre in Holland, with all the Christmas trimmings!

For anyone who does not know the European scene or Holland specifically, this is their Crufts dog show, their Westminster…the biggest they hold in the Netherlands. Normally held over two days in late November, the organisers decided to move from their traditional date to accommodate an extra days showing and in order to facilitate a transition to a better hall. The extra day became the National Show on Friday offering CACIB’s or FCI versions of Challenge Certificates in the UK. The move to the better hall was from the older Europa Hall into the more modern side of the Rai. (Pronounced ‘Rye’…) This typical Expo or event centre is on the outskirts of the historical city of Amsterdam, obviously known for its infamous ‘Red Light’ district and liberal attitude to smoking a certain type of plant, but equally one of the great European capitals with superb sights and culture if you ever want to mix dog showing and an interesting weekend away.

This is certainly one of the draws for many of the exhibitors who come from far and wide. Each day their numbers exceeded 2000 and listening to the many accents around you realise they have been drawn from Italy, France, Belgium, Germany, many from the UK and certainly a lot from the emerging Eastern Europe, notably Russia. In a previous OUR DOGS article from Europe, the headline stated ‘The Russians are coming!’ referring to the rise and rise of the Russian exhibitor; here we had folks who had travelled from Siberia (somewhere you hear of but never think of people breeding pedigree dogs there!) and Russia, travelling 29 hours by car to get to the show…a distance of about 2,500 miles. Dedicated or what?

We were used to arrive at the Amsterdam Winner Show and to enter into the original main hall, the Europa Hall. Some halls are being renovated and an advertising poster explained to onlookers the new project and developments.

 

A new look

 

This year the show had also a new team of 12 people with the new Show Manager Richard Lensink. They worked very hard to start to rebuild the show in the new set up.  So at a time when entries to dog shows world wide are under scrutiny, it was a bold move by the organisers, the Dutch club ‘The Cynophilia’ to add an extra day. To add to the pressure, their previous show chairman Rony Doedijns had been elevated to the main Dutch Kennel Club which meant a whole new team was in charge and running the show largely for the first time. That can always mean problems but as long as there are willing hands helping and common sense prevailing, you can win through…which was the case here; ask any visitor to the show and you would not have known there had been any background changes. Large open rings, a great main ring well lit, two decent sized pre judging rings, a breed club section, junior handling specials, plenty of trade stands for shopping, and this year a health centre area with regular talks. In a friendly gesture, coffee and other drinks were taken round the trade stands by some of the many vet students who were helping at the show. Smart thinking and a nice touch.

Saturday night saw the judges entertained in a traditional Dutch boat club in the middle of canals and lakes…very nice in the Spring we are told! The final part of the journey was on a (very) small ferry…always funny to see dog judges out of their comfort zone! A great night though.

All of this was set off against a background where the ‘health and safety’ brigade had mounted a campaign in the Dutch press against pedigree dog breeds, labelling them as ‘extreme’. Seems to be the trendy thing to do nowadays over here. However, the Show Chairman Hildeward Hoenderken (HH to his friends!) managed to use the opportunity in TV interviews to put the case for dogs and it may have even had a good effect on visitor numbers.

 

Visitor dogs

 

Economics plays a big part in any show so it was heartening to see queues developing to pay at the gate where people come in (and pay for) visitor dogs; this is not something you would see for example at Crufts in the UK. They came to see a wide variety of breeds judged by an international panel which belied the feeling (gained on social networks) that ‘everyone’ was in Florida for the AKC/Eukanuba Finals. In fact this was one heck of a show weekend as the world of dogs seemed to be on the move starting with the AKC and Eukanuba weekend and the Eukanuba World Challenge; there were many of us in Amsterdam and even more it seemed in Finland for the Helsinki Winners Show where they had over 8,000 dogs each day. Add to that the Ladies Kennel Association show in the NEC, Birmingham with about 10,000 dogs and you begin to get the picture! Certainly the airlines are doing good business out of dogs!

The organisers had to find a new way to speak with visitors, exhibitors and journalists. The last category can be even considered a bit like the ambassador of an event. If they don’t have the correct material to write the article, they can put together reports that can sometimes be misunderstood. So a press conference was organized on Saturday morning. The goal was to open a dialogue with the journalists.  It is a pity more press did not attend because the speaker was ready to answer to many questions and what he said was very constructive.

The Dutch Kennel Club is building a new program to improve the health of the dogs. This shows organisers held a meeting (as many Kennel Clubs are now doing) with the judges telling them not to base their judgments only on the beauty of the animal but also on its health. They also invited many veterinary students to the show to increase their knowledge of the dog world. The study must also be done in the field and dog shows are a really good way to improve the knowledge learnt at university in books. It can sometimes happen that as a vet, they need to treat a pedigree breed even when they had never seen one before. A special talk had been also organised with the breed watch teams, to teach them how to speak with a visitor or an exhibitor in case of any mistreatment.

The Kennel Club had also created a new computer program which is being improved. Each country has its way to organize its catalogue but the alphabetic part with the number of the entered dogs is very important because it helps you to get in touch with the owner or even to find the own dog in the catalogue. The point was that the number of the entries printed at the end of the catalogue was not the number of the dog in the catalogue but of the registration number of the Kennel Club.

A problem at the new venue was the higher level for the show, whereas before it was all ground level. The entry of the exhibitors on the first day had been a disaster: one entry for 2,000 dogs and up a hard slope, not easy to do a queue with the cages. In the afternoon the gate was closed. Many exhibitors had to take the lift as it was the only way to leave the show with cages and trolleys. The result had been that on the second day the lift was out of order. A few people with wheelchairs had a hard time to find a solution to go home. In front of these unexpected things that took place on the first day, the organisation reacted very well finding good solutions. On the following days there were no more queues and the lifts were repaired.

An excellent idea had been to instruct the car park attendants. They showed the way to exhibitors to reach the new entry of the show. The organisers had also the idea to send to all the exhibitors by mail the map of the new fair area with the entry to the show.

Since 1st January 2014 the exhibitors can leave the show earlier. Will it be a positive change for the exhibitors? Will they enter more dogs to the shows? Will the number of exhibitors coming from far increase, knowing that they are able to leave the show before? Or will it be a bad idea because exhibitors not having won will leave the show earlier and the visitors will be able to see fewer dogs and the trade stands would suffer? For this event the public remained very numerous until the end of the show.

 

A New Formula

 

This year Amsterdam decided to adopt a new formula: 3-2-2. It is the first time that two International dog shows are planned on three days at this event. This formula is already very popular abroad. In Italy there are more CACIB then weekends. It is a great opportunity for exhibitors coming from abroad. In Amsterdam because of the double CAC of the Winner show there was the possibility to win three CAC and two CACIB.

The first Dutch club to organise two international shows in the same week end had been Maastricht in September 2013 but it was on two days. Amsterdam tried the same thing on three days. Will they repeat the same experience next year? It is not sure but the first International show in Amsterdam with a Simple CAC attracted about 2,000 dogs. The new Kennel Club Team will reflect during this year if there will be a second running of this format…We will know their answer later this year.

On Friday for the National Show the BIS judge was Rafael Malo Alcrudo (Esp). The winner was German Middle Black Poodle, Pan Tau v.d. Hutzelschweiz (A B Schilling). Second was the Italian Welsh Terrier, Cunnings Marcus (G. Avvenuti). (See Rafas report in this feature).

There were 23 countries present at the show with the number of British or Irish people increasing plus some from Scotland. Main winners included Group 1, judged by Juan Naveda Carrero (Esp), the Schipperke, Monterrez Jingle Belle For Hantreved; owned by Kelly Lawless (Irl). In the second place in the 5th Group, judged by Ewa Nielsen (Sweden), we saw the Shiba Inu, Vormund Jean Paul Gaultier, owned by C. R. Roskell & M. Dunhill (GB). The winner of the 9th Group, the Japanese Chin, Nisyros Al Pachino, owned by Ian Watt (GB) and judged by Revaz Khamasuridze (Russia) became Reserve BIS under Mrs Liliane de Ridder-Onghena (B). And there were American connections too as the Japanese Chin had just been flown in with handler Maripi Wooldridge and Co-owner Jennifer Stevens.  A delighted team!

In the pre-ring we met other exhibitors who crossed the Channel to show their dogs. The Parson Russell Terrier was Kylini Celtic Tiger (Owner: K. Rimmer-GB), the Finnish Lapphund, Elbereth Kia Joins Bridus  (S. & E. Bird - GB) and the Intermediate Mexican Hairless Dog, Apancingo At Ammexbiche (Owner: Mrs Gordon - GB). The Coton de Tulear, Wyldewyche Geonelli (J. Macisaac & Deschamps – GB) was pre selected in the main ring.

Among the puppies we could see the first steps of future stars. The Pug, Pugalicious Seloys Pride (WA Davenshot - GB) and the French Bulldog, Mr Nemo of Kingfriend (K. & L. Croarkin - GB). The Parson Russell Terrier, Foxwarren Picasso (Owner: E. J. Chapman - GB) was placed third puppy on the podium by Natalia Nekrosiene (Sweden)

In the Baby category the Parson Russell Terrier, Kylini Magical Myst (K. Rimmer - GB) occupied the first step of the podium on Saturday under the judge, Peter van Baaren-Grob - NL). 

At the show we met many people coming from Great Britain. In the second place, Group 1, there was the Schipperke, Franhowill Envy Nubu (Owner: Zwoferink & McLachlan). Not all the Schipperke can be showed in Europe. The FCI standard only admits the black colour. The Border Terrier, Chatmoss Rebel Rebel (Owner: Darren and P. M. Lockley) was showed for the first time in Holland. For its owner the ending of the quarantine and the construction of the Channel Tunnel opened the borders between the UK and the continent. “It is fantastic to meet other people, breeders, judges. We can have the opinion of other nations about the level of our dogs. We can also export and import more easily. We can choose new bloodlines. I sent a bitch of mine to Sweden where she had four puppies and I imported other dogs. I started to breed five years ago. I already showed in Courtrai where my bitch won the CAC and CACIB.” In Amsterdam, Chatmoss Rebel Rebel was second in the Group under Mrs Eeva Rautala (Fin). In the 6th Group under the judge Denis Kuzelij (Bulgaria) we met on the second place the Dalmatian, Offordale Chevalier owned by J. Alexander. “It is the second time I show him in Europe. He is the Top Dalmatian with 38 CCs. He also was 4th in the Group at Crufts 2013 and his sister was BCC. I wanted new experiences so crossed the Channel. What a great thing. I went to the Belgian Specialty where he was first. It is great to meet and see other champions with whom your dog can compete.”

In the pre-ring we could speak with other people who preferred to take the ferry to reach the show. “It is also well organised. Dogs can’t travel with you. They are stowed in the hold. There are cages and a camera shows you what your dog does. If you want to do a visit to him, you have a code to open the gate. It is not a place where everybody can visit. In other ferries you can live the dog in the car”. The Sheldobchi Kennel came to Amsterdam with a mini pack of Miniature Mexican Hairless Dog: two babies, one junior, one open and one champion class. They won the CACIB and the RCACIB and of course the BOB. 

In the junior ring we saw the American Akita, Aminaptra Remember My Name (owner Poppe). It was bred by L. Brown and moved to Holland where it lives. In the Group 10, there was the Borzoi, Albaneiler Epos Olloatir (Owner: Lorraine Harvey) had the emotion to show its movement in the main ring after having beaten 16 Borzois. 

Main UK success was the Japanese Chin, G. Champion Nisyros Al Pachino who was actually bred in the UK by David Anderson and Ian Watt. Marcel clearly has great breeding; his litter sister has 22 CCs in the UK and was top bitch two years ago. He has been in the USA since March of 2011. Perhaps one of the greatest highlights of his career was when he won the 100th Anniversary Japanese Chin Club of America National Specialty under Sari Brewster Tietjen who is undeniably considered the Mother of The Breed.  

So this weekend he was flying back to be reunited with his breeders and it was David who took the group with Marcel on Saturday….oops, big problem as he and partner Ian had plane tickets booked for Sunday during the day, not thinking they would win the Group and be required to stay for Sunday night! 

Hasty arrangements were made via the OUR DOGS stand and our connections so we could help locate people driving back to the UK on Sunday evening. Step up to the plate Maripi Wooldridge to take Marcel into the big ring and nearly scoop the top spot under Belgian All Rounder Liliane de Ridder, just being pipped at the post by a dog at the other end of the size scale, the Great Dane! 

No shame in not getting past the big fellah, handled also by a big chap …Fabio Allegra, well known handler on the European scene, who also took BIS at the world show in Paris in 2011. 

The Dane Diamante Della Baia Azzurra is only 20 months old, bred in Italy (Breeder: P. Donati, Baia Azzurra Kennel) and owned by Mr Fabio Ottaviani. The dog has an impressive list of wins to his credit already including World Dog Show Budapest 2013  Junior Best In Show of all Breeds, Croatian Championship Zagreb 2013 Best in Show and a number of BIS wins at breed specialties around Europe.

So there you have it; a taste of dog showing Dutch style. Let us hope that the new team get the stamp of approval from the Dutch Kennel Club and that we will all be back again in old Amsterdam next Christmas for the 125th edition of the event!

The 124th Amsterdam All Winners dog show was itself a winner in deepest December at the Rai Centre in Holland, with all the Christmas trimmings!

For anyone who does not know the European scene or Holland specifically, this is their Crufts dog show, their Westminster…the biggest they hold in the Netherlands. Normally held over two days in late November, the organisers decided to move from their traditional date to accommodate an extra days showing and in order to facilitate a transition to a better hall. The extra day became the National Show on Friday offering CACIB’s or FCI versions of Challenge Certificates in the UK. The move to the better hall was from the older Europa Hall into the more modern side of the Rai. (Pronounced ‘Rye’…) This typical Expo or event centre is on the outskirts of the historical city of Amsterdam, obviously known for its infamous ‘Red Light’ district and liberal attitude to smoking a certain type of plant, but equally one of the great European capitals with superb sights and culture if you ever want to mix dog showing and an interesting weekend away.

This is certainly one of the draws for many of the exhibitors who come from far and wide. Each day their numbers exceeded 2000 and listening to the many accents around you realise they have been drawn from Italy, France, Belgium, Germany, many from the UK and certainly a lot from the emerging Eastern Europe, notably Russia. In a previous OUR DOGS article from Europe, the headline stated ‘The Russians are coming!’ referring to the rise and rise of the Russian exhibitor; here we had folks who had travelled from Siberia (somewhere you hear of but never think of people breeding pedigree dogs there!) and Russia, travelling 29 hours by car to get to the show…a distance of about 2,500 miles. Dedicated or what?

We were used to arrive at the Amsterdam Winner Show and to enter into the original main hall, the Europa Hall. Some halls are being renovated and an advertising poster explained to onlookers the new project and developments.

 

A new look

 

This year the show had also a new team of 12 people with the new Show Manager Richard Lensink. They worked very hard to start to rebuild the show in the new set up.  So at a time when entries to dog shows world wide are under scrutiny, it was a bold move by the organisers, the Dutch club ‘The Cynophilia’ to add an extra day. To add to the pressure, their previous show chairman Rony Doedijns had been elevated to the main Dutch Kennel Club which meant a whole new team was in charge and running the show largely for the first time. That can always mean problems but as long as there are willing hands helping and common sense prevailing, you can win through…which was the case here; ask any visitor to the show and you would not have known there had been any background changes. Large open rings, a great main ring well lit, two decent sized pre judging rings, a breed club section, junior handling specials, plenty of trade stands for shopping, and this year a health centre area with regular talks. In a friendly gesture, coffee and other drinks were taken round the trade stands by some of the many vet students who were helping at the show. Smart thinking and a nice touch.

Saturday night saw the judges entertained in a traditional Dutch boat club in the middle of canals and lakes…very nice in the Spring we are told! The final part of the journey was on a (very) small ferry…always funny to see dog judges out of their comfort zone! A great night though.

All of this was set off against a background where the ‘health and safety’ brigade had mounted a campaign in the Dutch press against pedigree dog breeds, labelling them as ‘extreme’. Seems to be the trendy thing to do nowadays over here. However, the Show Chairman Hildeward Hoenderken (HH to his friends!) managed to use the opportunity in TV interviews to put the case for dogs and it may have even had a good effect on visitor numbers.

 

Visitor dogs

 

Economics plays a big part in any show so it was heartening to see queues developing to pay at the gate where people come in (and pay for) visitor dogs; this is not something you would see for example at Crufts in the UK. They came to see a wide variety of breeds judged by an international panel which belied the feeling (gained on social networks) that ‘everyone’ was in Florida for the AKC/Eukanuba Finals. In fact this was one heck of a show weekend as the world of dogs seemed to be on the move starting with the AKC and Eukanuba weekend and the Eukanuba World Challenge; there were many of us in Amsterdam and even more it seemed in Finland for the Helsinki Winners Show where they had over 8,000 dogs each day. Add to that the Ladies Kennel Association show in the NEC, Birmingham with about 10,000 dogs and you begin to get the picture! Certainly the airlines are doing good business out of dogs!

The organisers had to find a new way to speak with visitors, exhibitors and journalists. The last category can be even considered a bit like the ambassador of an event. If they don’t have the correct material to write the article, they can put together reports that can sometimes be misunderstood. So a press conference was organized on Saturday morning. The goal was to open a dialogue with the journalists.  It is a pity more press did not attend because the speaker was ready to answer to many questions and what he said was very constructive.

The Dutch Kennel Club is building a new program to improve the health of the dogs. This shows organisers held a meeting (as many Kennel Clubs are now doing) with the judges telling them not to base their judgments only on the beauty of the animal but also on its health. They also invited many veterinary students to the show to increase their knowledge of the dog world. The study must also be done in the field and dog shows are a really good way to improve the knowledge learnt at university in books. It can sometimes happen that as a vet, they need to treat a pedigree breed even when they had never seen one before. A special talk had been also organised with the breed watch teams, to teach them how to speak with a visitor or an exhibitor in case of any mistreatment.

The Kennel Club had also created a new computer program which is being improved. Each country has its way to organize its catalogue but the alphabetic part with the number of the entered dogs is very important because it helps you to get in touch with the owner or even to find the own dog in the catalogue. The point was that the number of the entries printed at the end of the catalogue was not the number of the dog in the catalogue but of the registration number of the Kennel Club.

A problem at the new venue was the higher level for the show, whereas before it was all ground level. The entry of the exhibitors on the first day had been a disaster: one entry for 2,000 dogs and up a hard slope, not easy to do a queue with the cages. In the afternoon the gate was closed. Many exhibitors had to take the lift as it was the only way to leave the show with cages and trolleys. The result had been that on the second day the lift was out of order. A few people with wheelchairs had a hard time to find a solution to go home. In front of these unexpected things that took place on the first day, the organisation reacted very well finding good solutions. On the following days there were no more queues and the lifts were repaired.

An excellent idea had been to instruct the car park attendants. They showed the way to exhibitors to reach the new entry of the show. The organisers had also the idea to send to all the exhibitors by mail the map of the new fair area with the entry to the show.

Since 1st January 2014 the exhibitors can leave the show earlier. Will it be a positive change for the exhibitors? Will they enter more dogs to the shows? Will the number of exhibitors coming from far increase, knowing that they are able to leave the show before? Or will it be a bad idea because exhibitors not having won will leave the show earlier and the visitors will be able to see fewer dogs and the trade stands would suffer? For this event the public remained very numerous until the end of the show.

 

A New Formula

 

This year Amsterdam decided to adopt a new formula: 3-2-2. It is the first time that two International dog shows are planned on three days at this event. This formula is already very popular abroad. In Italy there are more CACIB then weekends. It is a great opportunity for exhibitors coming from abroad. In Amsterdam because of the double CAC of the Winner show there was the possibility to win three CAC and two CACIB.

The first Dutch club to organise two international shows in the same week end had been Maastricht in September 2013 but it was on two days. Amsterdam tried the same thing on three days. Will they repeat the same experience next year? It is not sure but the first International show in Amsterdam with a Simple CAC attracted about 2,000 dogs. The new Kennel Club Team will reflect during this year if there will be a second running of this format…We will know their answer later this year.

On Friday for the National Show the BIS judge was Rafael Malo Alcrudo (Esp). The winner was German Middle Black Poodle, Pan Tau v.d. Hutzelschweiz (A B Schilling). Second was the Italian Welsh Terrier, Cunnings Marcus (G. Avvenuti). (See Rafas report in this feature).

There were 23 countries present at the show with the number of British or Irish people increasing plus some from Scotland. Main winners included Group 1, judged by Juan Naveda Carrero (Esp), the Schipperke, Monterrez Jingle Belle For Hantreved; owned by Kelly Lawless (Irl). In the second place in the 5th Group, judged by Ewa Nielsen (Sweden), we saw the Shiba Inu, Vormund Jean Paul Gaultier, owned by C. R. Roskell & M. Dunhill (GB). The winner of the 9th Group, the Japanese Chin, Nisyros Al Pachino, owned by Ian Watt (GB) and judged by Revaz Khamasuridze (Russia) became Reserve BIS under Mrs Liliane de Ridder-Onghena (B). And there were American connections too as the Japanese Chin had just been flown in with handler Maripi Wooldridge and Co-owner Jennifer Stevens.  A delighted team!

In the pre-ring we met other exhibitors who crossed the Channel to show their dogs. The Parson Russell Terrier was Kylini Celtic Tiger (Owner: K. Rimmer-GB), the Finnish Lapphund, Elbereth Kia Joins Bridus  (S. & E. Bird - GB) and the Intermediate Mexican Hairless Dog, Apancingo At Ammexbiche (Owner: Mrs Gordon - GB). The Coton de Tulear, Wyldewyche Geonelli (J. Macisaac & Deschamps – GB) was pre selected in the main ring.

Among the puppies we could see the first steps of future stars. The Pug, Pugalicious Seloys Pride (WA Davenshot - GB) and the French Bulldog, Mr Nemo of Kingfriend (K. & L. Croarkin - GB). The Parson Russell Terrier, Foxwarren Picasso (Owner: E. J. Chapman - GB) was placed third puppy on the podium by Natalia Nekrosiene (Sweden)

In the Baby category the Parson Russell Terrier, Kylini Magical Myst (K. Rimmer - GB) occupied the first step of the podium on Saturday under the judge, Peter van Baaren-Grob - NL). 

At the show we met many people coming from Great Britain. In the second place, Group 1, there was the Schipperke, Franhowill Envy Nubu (Owner: Zwoferink & McLachlan). Not all the Schipperke can be showed in Europe. The FCI standard only admits the black colour. The Border Terrier, Chatmoss Rebel Rebel (Owner: Darren and P. M. Lockley) was showed for the first time in Holland. For its owner the ending of the quarantine and the construction of the Channel Tunnel opened the borders between the UK and the continent. “It is fantastic to meet other people, breeders, judges. We can have the opinion of other nations about the level of our dogs. We can also export and import more easily. We can choose new bloodlines. I sent a bitch of mine to Sweden where she had four puppies and I imported other dogs. I started to breed five years ago. I already showed in Courtrai where my bitch won the CAC and CACIB.” In Amsterdam, Chatmoss Rebel Rebel was second in the Group under Mrs Eeva Rautala (Fin). In the 6th Group under the judge Denis Kuzelij (Bulgaria) we met on the second place the Dalmatian, Offordale Chevalier owned by J. Alexander. “It is the second time I show him in Europe. He is the Top Dalmatian with 38 CCs. He also was 4th in the Group at Crufts 2013 and his sister was BCC. I wanted new experiences so crossed the Channel. What a great thing. I went to the Belgian Specialty where he was first. It is great to meet and see other champions with whom your dog can compete.”

In the pre-ring we could speak with other people who preferred to take the ferry to reach the show. “It is also well organised. Dogs can’t travel with you. They are stowed in the hold. There are cages and a camera shows you what your dog does. If you want to do a visit to him, you have a code to open the gate. It is not a place where everybody can visit. In other ferries you can live the dog in the car”. The Sheldobchi Kennel came to Amsterdam with a mini pack of Miniature Mexican Hairless Dog: two babies, one junior, one open and one champion class. They won the CACIB and the RCACIB and of course the BOB. 

In the junior ring we saw the American Akita, Aminaptra Remember My Name (owner Poppe). It was bred by L. Brown and moved to Holland where it lives. In the Group 10, there was the Borzoi, Albaneiler Epos Olloatir (Owner: Lorraine Harvey) had the emotion to show its movement in the main ring after having beaten 16 Borzois. 

Main UK success was the Japanese Chin, G. Champion Nisyros Al Pachino who was actually bred in the UK by David Anderson and Ian Watt. Marcel clearly has great breeding; his litter sister has 22 CCs in the UK and was top bitch two years ago. He has been in the USA since March of 2011. Perhaps one of the greatest highlights of his career was when he won the 100th Anniversary Japanese Chin Club of America National Specialty under Sari Brewster Tietjen who is undeniably considered the Mother of The Breed.  

So this weekend he was flying back to be reunited with his breeders and it was David who took the group with Marcel on Saturday….oops, big problem as he and partner Ian had plane tickets booked for Sunday during the day, not thinking they would win the Group and be required to stay for Sunday night! 

Hasty arrangements were made via the OUR DOGS stand and our connections so we could help locate people driving back to the UK on Sunday evening. Step up to the plate Maripi Wooldridge to take Marcel into the big ring and nearly scoop the top spot under Belgian All Rounder Liliane de Ridder, just being pipped at the post by a dog at the other end of the size scale, the Great Dane! 

No shame in not getting past the big fellah, handled also by a big chap …Fabio Allegra, well known handler on the European scene, who also took BIS at the world show in Paris in 2011. 

The Dane Diamante Della Baia Azzurra is only 20 months old, bred in Italy (Breeder: P. Donati, Baia Azzurra Kennel) and owned by Mr Fabio Ottaviani. The dog has an impressive list of wins to his credit already including World Dog Show Budapest 2013  Junior Best In Show of all Breeds, Croatian Championship Zagreb 2013 Best in Show and a number of BIS wins at breed specialties around Europe.

So there you have it; a taste of dog showing Dutch style. Let us hope that the new team get the stamp of approval from the Dutch Kennel Club and that we will all be back again in old Amsterdam next Christmas for the 125th edition of the event!
 


THE BIS Judge in Amsterdam, Liliane de Ridder comments for OUR DOGS:

 

As many of you may know I did the BIS judging of Courtrai (Kortrijk) recently – this was Belgium’s biggest show this year and of course I was thrilled to get the invitation to judge the BIS of the famous Winners Show in Amsterdam, Holland’s biggest show.  To compare both shows is rather difficult, but both have a good quantity of sparkle and glory and I think exhibitors feel welcome.

I was judging three days and I saw a good number of breeds passing in front of me. I appreciated the big rings and I was impressed by the high quality of the Lhasa Apsos.

On Sunday I had the pleasure to judge my own breed, Dalmatians. There a young bitch April Love Of The Million Hairs took BOB and later on, the Group under Rony Doedijns. Quite a temptation for me when I entered the ring for “la Grande finale”... 

However, my BIS was a 20 months fawn Great Dane.  His name Diamante Della Baia Azzura suited him well. He is a sturdy, bold male with good substance, a real eye catcher when he moved around the ring. He has a lot of temperament, but he was well controlled and after this presentation I only said “Wow” – do you need more to be happy and satisfied? For the Reserve BIS I did not go for the Dalmatian (she surely would have been my number 3) but I went for the white/black Japanese Chin, Ch Nisyros Al Pachino. He is so nicely square in his overall picture and has a lovely head and expression and a very nice coat condition.  He already finished under me on Friday as my BOB for the breed. He went around in great style and much dignity and was shown by his handler without any exaggeration and this dog let me bow my head respectfully.

Liliane de Ridder (Best in Show Judge)


English/Irish Exhibitors on the Podium at the Amsterdam Winners Show

 

Group 1

BOG 3 - Schipperke, Monterrez Jingle Belle For Hantreved. Owner: K. Lawless (Ire).

Group 5

BOG 2 - Shiba Inu, Vormund Jean Paul Gaultier. Owner: C. R. Roskell & M. Dunhill (GB).

Best Baby (Saturday)

Place 1 - Parson Russell Terrier, Kylini Magical Myst. Owner: K. Rimmer (GB).

Best Puppy (Saturday)

Place 3 - Parson Russell Terrier, Foxwarren Picasso. Owner: E. J. Chapman (GB).

BOB

Group 3 - Parson Russell Terrier, Kylini Celtic Tiger. Owner: K. Rimmer (GB).

Group 5 - Finnish Lapphund, Elbereth Kia Joins Bridus. Owner: S. & E. Bird (GB).

Group 9 - Coton de Tulear, Wyldewyche Geonelli. Owner: J. Macisaac & Deschamps (GB).

Best Puppy of the Breed

Group 9 - Mops, Pugalicious Seloys Pride. Owner: W. A. Davenshot (GB).

French Bulldog - Mr Nemo Of Kingfriend. Owner: K.. & L. Croarkin (GB).


The sense of (judging) life
(Spanish variant, nobody is perfect)

Sometimes I wonder about the reasons why us, judges, are travelling from here to there, crossing the countries along many kilometres, awaking up very early and being in the middle of the country side, or in the middle of any Fair Centre for hours, evaluating a variable amount of  average dogs.

And for what? The reasons can be very varied: to travel around and know new countries or, at least, new airports; to take care of breed true type across the universe as the Angel of Heaven; to have some drinks with friends; because the judges rosette seems to be a prestigious outward sign; or, last but not least, to enjoy some days off from your husband/wife… (EDITORS NOTE: now you are in deep trouble Rafa!)

All of them are very solid reasons, but I would pick a very egoistic one: to have the chance to admire for some minutes, only for yourself, a real outstanding dog. Sometimes, not too often, that happens. And you feel beauty, balance, type, temperament; I would say ART in block letters, as you can feel in your heart and your skin. And that moment you are repaid for all the small or big inconveniences.

This Winner Amsterdam Show 2013, I felt it four or five times. On Friday Best in Show, with the wonderful black Poodle, full of glamour, temperament and type which I gave the most important award of the previous show, and also for the stunning Great Dane, one of the best I have seen in my life, to whom I gave the Group and after got the Winner Best in Show under Mrs Lilianne de Ridder.

Just to be able to touch and watch both of them (a very small dog and a giant one, but both with supreme qualities) from the short distance is enough price for the trip to Amsterdam. Of course, the show was fantastic, as well as the friends, but the experience to have the privilege to admire these two dogs (and a couple more) is why I like to judge dogs.

Happy New Year.






 

Read 1973 times Last modified on Monday, 12 September 2016 10:34

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